Storm Survivor

On October 12, 1979, one of the earth’s (if not the strongest) most massive storms ever, named Typhoon Tip, formed off the coast of southern Japan in the Western pacific. Typhoon Tip had the lowest sea level pressure ever observed on the earth. Peak wind gusts reached 190 mph while the storm churned and decimated the western pacific. This massive typhoon holds the record for the most enormous storm on earth. The diameter of circulation spanned approximately 1,380 miles. The diameter was the distance from New York City to Dallas, Texas. It weakened just before landfall in southern Japan on October 19, 1979. Extensive flooding destroyed more than 20,000 homes in Japan, and eighty-six people lost their lives.  

He threw stones at David and all the servants of King David; and all the people and all the mighty men were at his right hand and at his left. (v.6)

~ 2 Samuel 16:6-12 NASB ~

The world has been facing storms since the beginning of time. Some of us can attest that we have either been in a storm, survived a storm, or will endure a storm. Storms are not a respecter of persons; they are equal opportunists. You never know where a storm will occur. We can say in one’s lifetime, we will experience a few. Do you remember a time when you went through a physical storm? And how did you respond? Were you cool, calm, and collected; were you the anxious type; were you the take charge type, or perhaps you can remember becoming paralyzed with fear?

Once while driving, a storm raged, and I observed all types of reactions in those few moments. Some continued traveling as they had been, regardless of the torrential downpour. Others put their hazards on and slowed what seemed to be a slow idle. You had also those that pulled over completely under bridges and decided to wait for the storm to pass. Last but not least, we have those who appear careless and speed up as if to challenge the storm to prove who is more dangerous.

King David found himself in many storms, but the Lord was always with him to carry him through. From sinning with Bathsheba, murdering her husband Uriah, and losing a love child. To the rebuke by the prophet Nathan causing the penning of the Fifty-first division of Psalms, considered a penitential psalm to the Lord. From his son Absalom organizing a coup against his daddy and taking over Jerusalem. Stemming from anger by a family tragedy in the rape of Tamar, David’s daughter, by her brother Amnon. David had to flee and found himself in the town of Bahurim. Shimei, son of Gera (from the clan of Saul’s family), is here tormenting and berating David. Talk about storms going from bad to worse.    

Can I propose how we view a physical storm; it will affect how we go through a spiritual one. I am not saying just tense up and act willy-nilly, but I believe there are lessons we can learn from King David about surviving storms. First, remember they are inevitable and that our God is invincible while going through them. There is purpose in a storm.

In this you greatly rejoice, even though now for a little while, if necessary, you have been distressed by various trials, so that the proof of your faith, being more precious than gold which is perishable, even though tested by fire, may be found to result in praise and glory and honor at the revelation of Jesus Christ.

~ 1 Peter 1:6-7 NASB ~

We must remember a storm can appear anywhere, and sometimes the only thing we can do is ride it out. Shimei was tormenting David as he traveled. Let me ask you, have you ever faced a Shimei, perhaps a situation that bothers you or maybe an individual that constantly creates situational anxiousness? The intentional stones others cast around or at us can cause damage if we allow them to.

We must search for the high road or the best action to take. Friend, running is not always the best strategy, but there are times that we must. David did not fall into the trap of attempting to prove who he was, and we must not allow a few haters to take us out of character. Stand tall and know who you are. Then David said…let him alone and let him curse, for the Lord has told him too. Perhaps the Lord will look on my affliction and return good to me instead of his cursing this day (v.11-12).  The king knew his place, and his strength and validation came from God, not what Shimei was attempting to control. Why? Because David was standing on sure footing.

Let me encourage you not to believe all the hype but validate the storm by your weatherman. Growing up, we listened to our local weatherman in the morning before school to get the play-by-play of the day’s forecast. The physical weatherman’s job is to try to give accurate information about the storm that is on the horizon, upon us, or about to be over. The spiritual weatherman is the Lord for those facing storms – He is never wrong about His forecast.

And we know that God causes all things to work together for our good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose.

~ Romans 8:28 NASB ~

Sometimes we may not understand why we are going through a storm, but with the proper perspective, there is a distinct discerning of the will of God while there. Friend, Jesus Christ is with us, and he knows how to help us navigate the rushing winds at our back and the torrential rain of others’ words that can take our visibility from us and leave us afraid, or so it seems.

I challenge you next time while going through a storm, no matter how difficult or nasty; allow the Lord to whisper to your spirit– it is only for a moment, and He is with you every step of the way.

Invited or Not?

God, I invite your searching gaze into my heart. Examine me through and through; find out everything that may be hidden within me. Put me to the test and sift through all my anxious cares.

~ Psalms 139:23 TPT ~

Imagine getting the call, a family member wanting to see you is making an impromptu visit to your home.  You quickly begin to straighten up (hopefully) because we want them to see the neat and tidy version and not the messy, day-to-day us. I do not know about you but the truth is I am not always neat and tidy. No, my house is never messy but sometimes we leave things out of place because we believe no one will see what’s inside unless we let them in.

However, as we look at our key verse, we see this is not what David is saying, in fact, it is the opposite. He desires the Lord to come inside and visit.

For me, this can be a challenge from day to day. I know it is a crucial element to make sure that I am allowing openly for the Holy Spirit to take a look (not a peek) inside my heart. This is a sign of surrender and a declaration of transparency that we, just like David, have to relinquish to the Lord. I can say this is not always easy for me? What about you?

The Passion translation emphasizes “gaze”, meaning almost a steady, intent look for a long time, in curiosity or wonder. The Lord wants to know what is going on inside of us, as He looks with a searching gaze. He wants to know those things that are not revealed in a moment but take a studying over. Like an art critic looking over a masterpiece in the gallery, to see intricate details missed by the naked eye.

I ask myself sometimes, “Why Lord?, I am not that interesting”, in fact, from where I stand, I feel like I embarrass him. But even in these moments of uncertainty or inadequacy, I especially need Him to come in. This verse in the Psalter is asking God to come over and look around. To see what is really going on behind closed doors “as is” because we want and need His presence to help us do better.

David says something interesting after he prays for the initial invite. Examine me through and through. To Examine means to inspect in detail and determine the nature and condition of a thing. David invited God’s searching gaze into his deepest, sensitive parts. He wants the Lord to look at his thoughts and feelings. David was saying, what do my actions convey? David wanted the Lord to check his outward motives first and then take another gaze.

In the Mosaic law, the priests were to come into God’s presence, without the blemish of sin or disobedience. If sin is committed and not confessed before the time they entered the tabernacle, they were struck down by the Almighty. If they were found to be unclean, the priests could not proceed and they were pulled out of the presence of God.

The actions may have changed but the principle of coming into the presence of the Lord pure is still the goal today. Now we confess our sins directly to the Father. Let us not be afraid to come into the presence of the Lord, like David. And not only just come in but allow Him to look around and stay awhile. I know from my own encounters with the Lord, though challenging, they have truly left me with more joy, more purpose, and more fulfillment in the end. Take a moment today and ask yourself how would a visit from the Lord leave you feeling? And if He stopped by today what would He find?

Continue to stay encouraged friends.

Don’t Believe the Hype Psalms 64

Evil can and will come in many forms. Sometimes it is recognizable, and at other times it is not. It can go right up to your door, walking on the same street, in your workspace, and even in your own home. As Black History Month comes to a close and I pondered what the Lord would give me to write, I came across this psalm in the Psalter. No, this is not a post that necessarily pertains to black history; however, I believe that there are some truths that we all can learn and help us to navigate through all the evil that masquerades in our day today.  

Sometimes there is nothing we can do to prevent it from striking. I don’t know about you, but I wish I could remedy or just not even have to deal with a lot of evil. Evil can move our pity and stir our indignation at times. Perhaps we argue, and even in a moment of generous impulse, we may try addressing the problem. We have seen countless examples of various evils that we as humans have attempted to address and stamp out, but it did not happen to our disappointment. From racism, political concern, police brutality, or movements believed to further our views of oppression, evil is still here and thriving. I am not glorifying opinions, but I am attempting to find a consensus that no matter your ethnicity, gender, economic status, political beliefs, or historical backdrop-evil is not a people problem but a sin issue.

It has been said of poets that they learn in suffering what they teach in song, and this is the experience of the psalmist David.

Psalms 64 gives us the perfect backdrop to understand or provide circumstantial evidence to prove our point. King David was such a prayer warrior, but more importantly, he was wise. He knew that he could do nothing about his situation. However, he knew who could. Talk about phoning a friend or using a lifeline. David was the best that did it.

1 John 5:19 tells us, “we know that we are of God and that the whole world lies in the power of the evil one.” Evil does not always warn that it is on the way; however, we realize that we have power with a secret weapon by prayer. We are victorious, friend. When we see wrong or evil accounts on the news or daily, we can still find hope. It will take work from all of us, however. We like to address one side of a coin, but we must handle it all. Yes, our country is going through much political unrest. January 6th is a prime example of what happens when evil’s power gains a foothold. Police brutality is wrong in the black community, but so is the killing of innocent police because of some in all communities’ actions. We cannot say we are Christians, but in our mind choose what sin matters to God and us and overlook others that are just as unfortunate. We outwardly profess Christianity, but our hearts inwardly still are filled with hatred, jealousy, and entitlement as humans.   

Here is a King David talking to God about a problem. King Saul has been attempting to ruin David, even kill David. And most of Saul’s officers were involved in this conspiracy to destroy him. Why were they trying to kill David? God anointed him as king, but it had not come to fruition, but was that the real reason?

People may give us all kinds of trouble, not “good trouble” like the late Congressman John Lewis termed. We must remember our battle is not against flesh and blood, but the enemy and his hosts. And when we are aware of Who fights for us, we can get into “good trouble” and not fear or concern ourselves with what is transpiring because we have the King of Kings and Lord of Lords going before us.

Be still and know that I am God. I will be exalted among the nations; I will be exalted in the earth.

~ Psalms 46:10 ~

Keep hope and do not believe the hype but rest in our Lord and Savior in these times. I wish I could say they are unprecedented, but they are not. Though packaged differently we have been here before. Yet we must remember we serve a God who has given us a blueprint in His Word to meet us where we are and provide us with hope, the ability to change, and even to repent.

1) Seek the Lord’s protection. (v.1-2) David begins with “Hear my voice” – he didn’t say this because God wasn’t paying attention but because he was coming with sincere intention.

a) David did not ask God to change the circumstances but fortify his own heart and deliver him from fear. The fear of the Lord mobilizes us, but the fear of man paralyzes us.

b) Hide me from the secret counsel of the wicked, from the insurrection of the workers of iniquity. (sin)

Insurrection here is not referencing a civil revolt against authority but the people speaking evil against David and taking action to ruin Him. Let’s face it; some people will not like us. Not because we have done anything but just because of what we represent. David represented something pure and different from what was, which scared the forces in power. His commitment was only to the Lord and not to his plan, even when David fell- he admitted he was wrong and was convicted and changed. That is the difference. Groups today stand for their belief systems and are driven more by emotional stirring (how this affects me personally), but we openly say it is spiritual. Still, if it were spiritually motivated- we would address the wrong on all accounts.

My mother used to say, “the more men indulge in sin, the blinder we become.” In other words, the more persistent we break the second great commandment, the more indifferent we grow to the first. In (v.5) of Psalms 64, David says, “they hold fast to themselves an evil purpose.”  David is addressing the evil of the hearts of conspirators set to harm. How disturbing it is for David, who fears God, to be experiencing this. David grieves over the waste and, worse still, the misapplication of human power; he confesses with shame and sorrows the sin that has brought such terrible outcomes into the world. What about you today, are you grieved by all that is going on in the world? Or are we grieving over parts and turning a blind eye to the rest.     

2) Ask for the Lord’s wisdom. (v.3-6) David knew what the enemy was plotting. We need to know the strategy of our enemy when he attacks. (2 Cor 2:11) Like a lion, he comes to devour (1Peter 5:8); as a serpent, he comes to deceive (2 Cor 11:1-4). David compares his enemies’ tongues to swords and their words to poisoned arrows (v.3). One of the enemy’s main weapons is an accusation. (Rev 12:10; Zech 3) God will always lead us in what to do when we ask Him for wisdom and not just react. The evidence of a life changed by transformation and not moved by what unfolds before our eyes define wisdom.

3) Trust the Lord for Victory (v.7-8) This is not always so simple, but by trusting in the Lord and obeying the Father’s direction, David was confident that God would defeat his enemies. Don’t get caught up in what you see in the media and even what others say on social media platforms. I even found myself chiming in and feeling a bit irritated at all that has been occurring, and no, this is not necessarily a bad thing, but when I check my heart- God showed me it was more emotion than trusting in Him. Let God’s love and Word help us not allow emotions to drive us. Because let us be real, there are many incandescent with rage over all that has been occurring, and it shows no matter where we are, what or whom we believe.

These application steps seem so universal, but they really can apply to every area of our lives.

Everyone has a perspective, but the only view we should be striving to imitate is Christ’s, as disciples of Him. And when that becomes our aim, the Lord has promised to fight our battles for us. God himself will shoot arrows at our enemies (v.7). Perhaps you are saying, Lord, how long or God do you not know what they are getting away with? One thing I know from my experience-nothing or no one gets away from our God, and in His time, he will make all crooked paths straight. All we need to do is do not believe the hype.

Be encouraged today.  

“Dress It Up”

Flip, tuck, pat, rub, Dad seasoned the bird with precision.

Growing up, my dad did most of the cooking in our household. Sunday dinner was the highlight of the week because we knew we would be in for a treat. Throughout the week, dinner typically consisted of smaller portions of our usual everyday meal. But Sunday was my favorite–it would include a whole chicken or a roast with many sides.

I can remember watching him season the bird with celery, onion, and various other seasonings. Dad used to say, “These seasonings are all good, but salt does a little extra. It dresses it up.” At the time, I was not concerned about salt, pepper, or paprika. What I knew was that I was going to eat like a king. Or at least in my mind, this is what I believed.

As a kid, those many years ago, I did not realize the effectiveness of salt not just for flavoring but in many other ways. Salt enhances. It’s one of the spices that can improve any food if appropriately used.

Let your speech always be with grace as though seasoned with salt, so that you will know how you should respond to each person.

~Colossians 4:6 NASB

Is this why Paul compared our speech to salt? God gave him an inside tract as to how we, as believers, could influence those in our sphere of influence. He realized that if we sprinkled the light of Christ in how we responded to those around us, no matter how negative or cold their attitudes were, there would be an improvement.

Like the flavoring of our food with natural salt that brings the best out of it, our speech should minister grace to the hearers. Our words should be pure and life-changing. Our words should cause the world to desire to hear more of what we have to say, and bring them to realize there is something different about us and the message we share.

I love Chick-Fil-A French fries. They are the perfect balance of the salt to potato, and the crinkle-cut presentation enhances my desire to eat more. I often find myself saddened, peering down into an empty fry carton as if someone stole the last few morsels from under my nose. On the other hand, if there were too much salt on these slivers of goodness I would have an adverse reaction. What am I trying to say? Salt will enhance, but only if it is appropriately used. But, salt can also hinder when it’s overused.

The spiritual application is this: Our words can enhance, or interfere, when we are speaking to those around us. So we must use discernment as to when and how much to speak. How many of our conversations would be different if we adhered to Paul’s recommendations? Words have the power to build up, or tear down, and that in an instant. Christ always wants us to build up.

There have been pivotal times in my household that I overwhelmed my wife with my words, and she did not want to receive anything from me at that moment. However, there also were times when she has wanted to hear more of what I was saying. This same principle can apply with my children. It can apply with relatives, friends, and even in the workplace.

Let no unwholesome word proceed from your mouth, but only such a word as is good for edification according to the need of the moment, so that it will give grace to those who hear.

~Ephesians 4:29 NASB

Salt also preserves. In biblical times, salt was added to the sacrifices. Those sacrifices were set apart to be given to the living God. It would help us say the right things in the right manner if we remembered that our words also are sacrifices to God. I don’t know about you, but this concept is not easy, and I don’t always remember to do this. Nor do I act like I should.

We should want to maintain our character, conduct, and conversations as holy, so that we represent Jesus Christ appropriately. We should maintain a lifestyle that helps others to desire a relationship with Christ as they listen to our words. When we view our speech this way, the effectiveness of our witness will be tasted by many.

Whether on our job, in our relationships, in our community outreaches, or perhaps even with our enemies, we want others to taste how good our Lord is by observing our speech and actions and how we preserve the presence of God in our daily lives. When we can still smile or give a pleasant word when we are cut-off in traffic, this is a witness. When those around us are complaining, but we bring hope to a negative conversation, this also is the seasoning of grace. When the climate around us is negative, rash, and hostile, we can still sprinkle hope and peace. These are the attributes of salt given for all to experience.

While there are some positives to salt, there are also some negatives. If the salt has lost its distinctiveness and the flavor is bland, it will not fulfill its purpose. Have you ever tasted bland salt? What did you do with it? You probably threw it away. Imagine, if my father had put bad seasoning on his famous chicken–I probably would not like chicken to this day. If salt cannot be tasted in food, then it is not being used correctly. If there is no enhancement or distinct difference when salt is added to food-then it is not suitable for anything good, and must be discarded.

When the Holy Spirit cannot be seen in our speech, we cannot effectively influence those we contact. Or if we do speak, and what we speak is negative and not exalting Christ, is it worth saying. Friend, let’s discern when to speak, how to speak so that Christ is exalted, and maintain lifestyles that shows others we are the Lord’s people.

Friend, examine your words as salt. Allow the Holy Spirit to season your speech with grace, so others can see Christ in you. Be purposeful with your words. Let them be like my dad’s delicious chicken–all dressed up and seasoned to perfection.

Are your words, like salt, precisely and effectively used, and full of grace?

Father God, I desire the distinct presence of Your Holy Spirit to be with me daily. Please help me to share Your good character by covering me with Your presence. Help me when I loose my effectiveness to witness to those I see every day, whether at home, work, or in the community. Allow me to spread Your love to all I meet so that those in my sphere of influence will desire to taste and see how good You are.

In Jesus’s Name, Amen.